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Woodworking

WOODWORK 9
This is an introduction to the safe and correct use of woodworking tools and machinery, as well as to common joinery and finishing procedures. This course is designed to teach essential woodworking skills. In addition to the traditional concern for craftsmanship and safety, emphasis will be placed on work habits, and efficient use of time. Students will be required to build projects centered on box construction and table construction techniques. In each assignment, a limited choice of designs is available, and upon completion of the course students will typically have built for themselves items such as a cutting board, a jewelry box and/or a CD case, an end table, and an item turned on the wood lathe, such as a mallet, bowl, or goblet.

WOODWORK 10
Intended for students who do not wish to wait until Carpentry and Joinery 11 to continue with their exploration in woodworking. This course is a continuation of the Grade 9 woodworking course. Students are presented with a much greater variety of project choices, all of which will require the mastery of more advanced woodworking skills.

WOODWORK 11
This course is suited to serious woodworkers, ones that might be interested in a career in the wood industry. Proper machine use and tool procedures will be taught so students can conduct themselves in a safe manner at school or on the job site. Joinery, fasteners, adhesives, plan reading and all machine operations appropriate for the required projects is also taught to ensure solid furniture or cabinet production. Finishes appropriate to the project will be chosen and applied so the object will last. Projects may include tables, dressers, chairs, jewelry boxes or chests, lathe turnings, clocks or medicine chests for example. Many students will build projects that are destined to become quality antiques!

RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION 12
For the majority of this course, the focus is on becoming familiar with the processes of residential construction, including the fundamentals of framing, roofing, closing-in, stair construction, etc. The first project is the construction of a sawhorse which can be put to use in the shop or at home. Students will then collaborate to build a client specific garden shed or some such structure. The course will be particularly useful to any student who: may be considering a career in the residential construction industry or related industries (such as
architecture, cabinetmaking, furniture-making, etc.) as well as for those who do not want to have to entirely depend on others in future years for their house-building, maintenance, or modification needs.

CABINET CONSTRUCTION 12
This course is largely a self-directed experience in which the learning outcomes and projects are a result of negotiation between the teacher and the student. In recognition of the student’s accumulated woodworking experience, he or she is encouraged to direct their project building energies towards the construction of items of personal challenge and usefulness. It is expected that larger-scale “master piece” type projects will be built by students in this course.